Australian VTOL news

General stuff that gets thrown about when Helicopter Pilots shoot the Breeze.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby pohm1 » Thu Feb 13 2020, 22:54

So what has changed? The passengers ordered a white wine, instead of a good red!!


Are you sure about that?

https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/au.news.yahoo.com/amphtml/coronavirus-drone-delivers-wine-couple-princess-diamond-013255074.html
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby havick » Sat Feb 15 2020, 23:21

Evil Twin wrote:You said you were leaving but you keep coming back, all you do is post drone material on a helicopter forum and wonder why people don't want you here.


In his defence, other drone material was posted before he chimed in.

Honestly drone flying while not manned, still has it’s place here in small doses.
Last edited by havick on Sun Feb 16 2020, 01:13, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Sat Mar 7 2020, 19:24

Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology reviewing alerting system – post-fires.

The Australian BOM provides an enormous amount of information to the emergency services during catastrophic weather episodes. During the current bushfire disaster, the BOM iwas assisted by the USA’s military satellites providing high-resolution imagery to assess flood and fire boundaries and Japanese meteorological satellites which can predict more accurately disastrous weather conditions.

But rural industries are suggesting ways to improve the current alerting protocols to avoid excessive losses in their area. Excluding Alaska and Hawaii, Australia has the same landmass as United States. Both are around 7.7 km2. However, Australia only has a population of 25 million, compared to the USA’s 324 million.

A year before the current bushfire disaster erupted across Australia, severe flooding in north-west Queensland killed more than 500,000 head of cattle due to the North-west Queensland's 2019 monsoon being one of the biggest on record. But an unexpected cold snap caused the widespread stock losses.

At present the focus is now on the southern areas of Australia where there has been a long-running drought, disastrous bushfires, many severe storms with hail and snow in some areas, and other weather events making aerial firefighting difficult. The loss Coulson Aviation’s Lockheed EC130 and three crew members when fighting a fire in less than ideal weather conditions is now under investigation. To date, the current fires have claimed four helicopters, fortunately with no loss of life. They all occurred in very hot weather conditions, which can reduce the performance of most helicopters.

Rural agricultural, livestock and aerial firefighting concerns have similar needs as they are all within the low-level airspace close to the ground. Hopefully, this review of existing methodology will help other nations such as USA, Canada and Spain, where fatal accidents have occurred during wildfire operations.

Next we will look how an international aerial firefighting service works with Australia’s state and territory tasking system; and complies with our unique aviation regulatory system.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Sat Mar 7 2020, 19:46

HAI Member Reception, Queensland, Australia

The Helicopter Association International (HAI) Executive Committee will be conducting its March 2020 board meeting on the Sunshine Coast of Australia on Sat 14 March 2020 - 6:30 to 8:30 pm.

As part of the event, HAI President and CEO Jim Viola, along with HAI Board Chair Jan Becker, Board Vice Chair Stacy Sheard, Board Treasurer Dan Schwarzbach, and Board Assistant Treasurer James Wisecup, will be hosting a function on March 14 at the Novotel Twin Waters Resort. Please plan to attend; we'd love to meet and mingle with you. And we'll provide drinks and nibbles. Venue: Novotel Twin Waters Resort, Water Lily Room, 270 Ocean Drive, Twin Waters QLD 4564, Australia. Attire is Business Casual.

HAI offers an open invitation to any helicopter operator, MRO professional, drone operator, pilot, engineer, enthusiast member, non-member, or other interested party to come meet with us and discuss our great industry. We're here to engage and get an international perspective on how we as an international association can help you with issues Down Under. Your voice is important, so come along and make a night of it. Please RSVP at your earliest convenience to Sarah Arnold. E: sarah.arnold@rotor.org

Be there and tell the world what you think about our future. Remember Australia has the second largest RW fleet in the Western.

More info? Tel: + 1 703-683-4646 http://www(dot)rotor.org
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Thu Mar 12 2020, 06:45

Question for HAI meeting?
Now UK is leaving EASA, will this have any significant change to FAA and HAI safety education programs underway or about to be developed?
HAI does great work assisting many smaller associations around the globe.
Any ideas?
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Thu Apr 9 2020, 02:11

Post COVID-19 business opportunities in the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region

Australian readers would no doubt agree there is a lot of misinformation about the helicopter industry in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. Fortunately, data released at the recent Singapore Airshow showed there are an estimated 6,000 helicopters in the region. Which is about one third of the civilian helicopter registrations in the USA.

The Australian and New Zealand helicopter figures were a surprise to many of the international visitors to Singapore Airshow in February 2020. These two countries with a combined population of only 30 million population have more than half (3,200) of the total helicopters in the area from India, Indonesia, Malaysia, China, Japan, and across to the Philippines; to name a few.

This is an interesting comparison to Canada which has a population of 37 million and 2,848 helicopters (2018 data).

Australian helicopter industry.
Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) data current to 14 Feb ’20 indicated Australia had 13,372 aeroplanes and 2313 helicopters for a total of 15,685 aircraft. Helicopters made up 15% of the registrations. Fleet growth rates over the past year for both aeroplanes and helicopters are effectively zero! This was a great disappointment to Australians as the helicopter industry growth is usually twice the traditional GDP at 4.6% pa. In fact, during the decade prior to the Global Financial Crisis; the growth rate was 7 to 8% pa.

Prior to COVID-19, economists suggest the slowed global economy, the prolonged drought in Australia, several severe flood disasters and the recent record-breaking bushfires have contributed to this situation. But there was good news coming from the recent Heli-Expo 2020 in the USA. Several leading manufacturers stated sales were about to move forward again. This would have been good news to the Robinson Helicopter Company whose products dominate the Australian register. The past year has seen a dramatic drop in their sales; but industry experts suggest global helicopter industry is just at the bottom of one of the seven-year cycles. Kurt Robinson, son of Frank Robinson, was optimistic about the immediate future as they were receiving a lot more enquiries. From the early eighties Australia has purchased 10% of the Robinson output.

Australia’s global position. Australia is ranked second in the western world for helicopter registrations. (It would be third after Russia which has mainly heavy machines and a small number of small privately-owned machines).

Australia has the largest fleet of light helicopters in the world, after the USA. Now listed are 1,413 piston engined helicopters (61% of registrations) and 897 turbine powered helicopters (39%). Of the 897 turbine powered helicopters, 630 are SE engined helicopters (70%) and 267 are ME (30%). The Robinson Helicopter Company dominates the Australian register with 1,201 machines, or 52% of all helicopter registrations. The Robinson lead helicopter is the R22 helicopter (617), closely followed by the R44 (553). The Robinson piston engine helicopters make up 85% of the Australian piston fleet.

International Registrations.
Probably due to the disastrous bushfires which have only recently been doused by flooding rains; many international helicopters were placed on the CASA Aircraft Register. Of the 2,313 helicopters on the register, 75 were registered as international aircraft. Companies represented: Argentina -1; Barbados - 1; Canada - 2; Cayman Islands - 7; France - 4; Ireland - 20; Japan - 2; New Zealand - 6; PNG - 3; Samoa - 1; United Kingdom - 3; and USA - 26 for a total of 75.

Location of Australian helicopters.
This often hotly disputed topic is left over from a situation which existed half a century ago. At that time, a great percentage of all aviation activities, including helicopter operations, occurred in Victoria. In fact, CASA’s predecessor was headquartered in Melbourne. But today, almost 50% of registered helicopters are north of the “Brisbane line” due to the expansion of rural, tourist and private operations in remote areas in the northern parts of the Australian continent. The leading state is Queensland 758, followed by New South Wales - 526; Victoria – 331; Western Australia - 290; Northern Territory - 191; South Australia – 77; Tasmania - 48 and Australian Capital Territory – 9.

New Zealand breaks records.
With a population of only 4.7 million, their aircraft register lists 5,401 aircraft of which 924 are helicopters, which make up 17% of the total. Robinson helicopters make up one quarter of the registrations with 245: consisting of R22 – 90, R44 – 149 and R66 – 6. Other piston types are well represented and probably make up about another 15%. The turbine fleet is dominated by single engine Bell 206 and Airbus 350 series used for agricultural and tourist operations. The AS350 has a good lead over the Bell 206 numbers.

Due to the need for high-performance helicopters to operate in mountainous and windy terrain, the New Zealand twin-engine fleet consists mainly of light twins capable of SAR and aeromedical work. By comparison to Australia, where long-range operations require larger helicopters which access more remote areas.

At present, New Zealand is recognised as a country with more helicopters per head of population than any other. They have 924 helicopters for only 4.7 million people – an excellent result! (5,086 people per helicopter). By comparison, Australia – 10,808 and USA 13,880.

What is happening in rest of APAC?
A report published at the Singapore Airshow stated although the expansion of the civil turbine helicopter fleet in the Asia-Pacific region continued in 2019 (up 2 percent), the growth trajectory is slowing, from 5% in 2018 and 3.9% in 2017. The fleet reached 4,373 civil helicopters in 2019, up from the 4,289 at the end of 2018. Report indicated a further drop of the growth rate to 1.5% is expected in 2020. This is reflected in the latest figures from Australia and New Zealand where growth has slowed significantly.

Focus on China.
This has occurred in mainland China. After seeing a 10 percent jump year-over-year in 2018, this has softened slightly to 6% net growth, or 41 helicopters, in 2019. While the rate is still well above the region’s average, it marked the first time since 2009 it had fallen to a single-digit percentage. More than half of the fleet, 53%, is used for multi-mission, with corporate, law enforcement, and charter uses each accounting for 8% of the remainder, followed by offshore at 7%, emergency medical at 6%, search and rescue at 6%, private at 2%, and training only at one percent. This creates an opportunity for other nations, who have a reasonable training capability to assist China. The provision of helicopter professionals, in much the same way as Australia has an enormous industry producing pilots for various Chinese Airlines.

OEM status?
Airbus continues to account for the largest share of the Asia-Pacific civil helicopter market at 42%, followed by Bell, this 27% and Leonardo at 11%. However, Leonardo saw the most growth in terms of net additions, with 34 more helicopters. Sikorsky, meanwhile, saw 13 deductions in 2019. Preferences remain for single engine turbine helicopters, accounting for 52%, while medium helicopters claim a 24% market share.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Mon Apr 13 2020, 01:55

WARNING! Another virus crisis is about to hit Australia!

African Swine Fever confirmed in PNG!

3 Apr ’20. African Swine Fever (ASF) was been detected for the first time in Papua New Guinea, bringing the disease to within a few hundred kilometres of Australia’s coastline.

In late February the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation reported a pig die-off of unknown origin had occurred in PNG’s Southern Highlands which had killed more than 300 pigs.

PNG’s Agriculture Minister John Simon has now confirmed the cause was ASF, after samples were sent to Australia for testing. ASF has now been detected in the provinces of Southern Highlands, Enga and Hela according to media sources. PNG’s National Agriculture and Quarantine Inspection Authority (NAQIA) said containment measures are now underway to stop its spread to other provinces and the coast.

In addition to the impact this will have on PNG’s own pork industry, it also means the disease is now on Australia’s doorstep.

The shortest border distance between the PNG's latest ASF case and Australia is about 150 kilometres; however, the northernmost Australian inhabited island, Boigu Island (in Qld), is about 5 kilometres from Papua New Guinea.

Australia’s Minister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency Management, David Littleproud said with the spread of ASF to our neighbours Timor-Leste, Indonesia and now Papua New Guinea, our biosecurity is more critical than ever. “With the confirmation of ASF in our near neighbour, our biosecurity measures are more important than ever. “We offer our assistance to PNG as they work to contain this disease.

“Biosecurity measures in place in the Torres Strait have been ramped up as a result of COVID-19 and are being re-assessed to ensure they effectively manage the serios risk that ASF in PNG poses to Australia. “We cannot take biosecurity for granted. It protects jobs, farms, and food and it supports the economy. We need everyone to do their part and comply with these conditions when travelling here. “The Australian government has a no-nonsense approach to biosecurity non-compliance because we know how important it is to keep pests and diseases like ASF off our shores.”

Biosecurity vigilance essential. Australian Pork Ltd CEO Margo Andrae said the detection of ASF in PNG reinforced the importance of the ongoing ASF mitigation work between the pork industry, government and other stakeholders.

“While ASF does not pose human health risks, the deadly virus would absolutely devastate Australia’s pork industry if it arrived here.”

“The potential national economic impact from an ASF incursion in Australia is estimated to be more than $2 billion,” Ms Andrae said. “There is no cure for ASF, and millions of Australian pigs would be at risk if the disease reached our country. That would devastate pork producers and Australian fresh pork supplies and seriously jeopardise the wellbeing of the 36,000 Australians employed in our industry.”

Ms Andrae said ASF represented potentially the biggest animal disease event the world has ever seen, having already killed hundreds of millions of pigs across Asia and Europe.

“ASF is now confirmed in PNG, Indonesia and Timor Leste and we’re concerned about its potential spread to the Pacific region. This battle is being fought across international borders and we welcome the Federal Government’s offer this week to assist PNG to contain the virus,” Ms Andrae said.

“Even with current travel restrictions, there’s no room for complacency in terms of ASF, especially given international postal services remain operational. That’s why the installation of two new 3D x-ray machines at the Sydney and Melbourne mail centres, as part of the Federal Government’s $66.6 million ASF-response package, is such an important part of our defence.

“Biosecurity measures in the Torres Strait have been strengthened as a result of COVID-19 and the Government is further reviewing those measures to reflect the risk ASF in PNG poses to Australia.” Confirmation of ASF in PNG coincides with the Inspector-General of Biosecurity’s release last week of the updated report on the adequacy of preventative border measures to mitigate the risk of ASF.

“A timely recommendation in the report is the inclusion of additional criteria in risk assessment for flights from ASF-affected countries, including a focus on seasonal farm workers,” Ms Andrae said. “We can’t afford any weak links in our defence against ASF. All aspects of monitoring at the border are critical, but so is the work by producers to strengthen on-farm biosecurity and the cross-agency collaboration being led by National Feral Pig Management Coordinator, Dr Heather Channon.”

Next – we look at possible roles for the helicopter and drone industries.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Wed Apr 15 2020, 20:48

Will cruise ship losses in 2020 boost the Australian helicopter industry?

Source: VTOL e-news Asia-Pacific – March 2020 Report.

Pre-coronavirus – good news for cruise lines.
In June 2019, the Australian Cruise Association predicted 30 million passengers would be carried globally by end of 2019. Due to the industry growing at 5-7% orders have been placed for another 122 ships to be rolled out by 2027.

In fact, 24 new cruise ships were launched during 2019.

It was estimated in 2027, 38 million passengers will have travelled on 434 ships. The global industry revenue will be USD$134 billion of which Australia’s share will be USD$6.7 billion (AUD$11.1 billion) or 5% of the global market. Looking back on 2019, prior to the COVID-19 coronavirus, the Australian Cruise industry may have carried an estimated 5% of the 30 million passengers, or 1.5 million and earned around AUD$8.7 billion in revenue. That is a lot of money!

Post-coronavirus – good news for helicopter industry. Unfortunately, the cruise ship industry suffered an incalculable amount of extremely adverse publicity due to the handling of their coronavirus issues. The evening television has been full of bad news, ships being stuck at sea due to being banned from sending passengers ashore. And of course, Australian taxpayers had to partly fund the enormous rescue activities to bring stranded Australians back home.

Because of this disastrous episode around the world, it must be assumed cruise companies will suffer greatly and have extremely low bookings over the coming five years or so.

But maybe there is a more positive outlook for Aussie (and Kiwi) operators to consider?

More soon in coming posts.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Sat Apr 18 2020, 18:28

Thoughts on post COVID-19 recovery opportunities

But on a more positive note, if only a small percentage of the would-be cruise ship customers decided to stay in Australia and go to our tourist centres often located in very remote areas, then this may be a chance for helicopter operators to participate more vigorously in tourist activities of clients who previously would spent a lot of money on air/sea voyages and onshore sightseeing.

Traditionally, our retirees have headed out in caravans and motorhomes to visit Australian attractions; and are proud to be called “Grey Nomads.” But this group is well known for being very frugal – and not doing aerial scenic flights.

By comparison, folks who are used to going on cruise liners are usually financially able to engage air transport within Australia to/from tourist attractions and partake of the more expensive experiences such as helicopter scenic flights. This group would probably be more likely to take tours involving regional airlines to the tourist areas to avoid the lengthy road travel timelines.

Lessons from COVID-19 medical studies. Although remote areas of Australia are reasonably well served by regional airlines and emergency service helicopter coverage; the provision of medical coverage to remote areas which have to accommodate a sharp increase in tourist numbers faces same the challenge noted by medical experts planning for the coronavirus pandemic.

They would have noted there is little excess capacity in the existing system to handle a larger number of generally elderly citizens far away from capital city major hospitals.

This problem previously called “the tyranny of distance” was the catalyst for the studies involving the tiltrotor technology industry. Although the AgustaWestland AW609 helicopter is probably 4 to 5 years away: it is the ideal machine for Australia due to its range of around 1300+ km (750 nautical miles) and being able to cruise at 275 knots.

In the short-term, existing helicopter rescue bases in remote areas would need additional helicopters and perhaps the introduction of an aeromedical aeroplane to transfer patients to capital cities for treatment of critical health issues.

HEMS helicopters in remote areas will need to be larger IFR multi-pilot machines with a longer range.

But this can only happen if the training industry can expand and provided advanced training and relief from some of the regulatory reform processes, which also now appears to complicate small helicopter operators conducting scenic flight operations. The latter is subject to a federal government senate enquiry by Senator Susan McDonald, Chair of Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee.

Remember to send your comments to your representative industry association for collation and later presentation to Susan's team.

As a child we were taught "Silence is Golden" but this does not apply when a Senate Committee offers you a chance to speak up and perhaps someone will listen - especially if it is an election year.

What do you think?
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby hand in pants » Sun Apr 19 2020, 07:14

Just one point, and I know I'm being pickie.
"The Agusta Westland AW609 is probably 4 to 5 years away". I remember working at Westpac in Newcastle about 20 years ago and Bell had a bunch of representatives call in and give a presentation on the tilt rotor and then asked for orders and deposits. Westpac dodged a bullet on that one.
Hand in Pants, I'm thinking, my god, that IS huge!!!!!!!!
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Evil Twin » Sun Apr 19 2020, 08:28

Equally, the regulator is slowly killing off the advanced training required with Regs such as Part 61!
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Fill-level » Sun Apr 19 2020, 08:37

Evil Twin wrote:Equally, the regulator is slowly killing off the advanced training required with Regs such as Part 61!


Come on Evil, with all those exemptions , all most every week..
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Sun Apr 26 2020, 19:46

Thoughts on Australian post COVID-19 recovery opportunities

Further to our previous posts on this topic and on a more positive note, if only a small percentage of the would-be cruise ship customers decided to stay in Australia and go to our tourist attractions we would possibly be creating an enormous new industry segment for the rotorcraft operators. The tourist attractions are often located in very remote areas. Perhaps, this may be a chance for helicopter operators to participate in tourist activities with clients who previously would spend a lot of money on overseas air/sea voyages and onshore sightseeing.

Australian retirees who traditionally head out in caravans and motorhomes to visit Australian attractions, proudly call themselves the “Grey Nomads.” This group is well known for being very frugal – and not doing aerial scenic flights.

However, the “refugees” from the cruise ship industry are somewhat different as they are used to spending a lot of money on the typical 1 to 2-week cruise. If forced to stay in Australia, due to the post global coronavirus pandemic, they may add a potential new market for the light helicopter industry.

At present, Australia with 2,300+ helicopters, is predominantly a light helicopter fleet. In fact, the Robinson Helicopter Company provides more than half of this number. At a guess, around one third of the Robinson fleet can be found with mustering companies in remote areas; and by therefore would be able to provide typical tourist activities creating a new industry segment.

In summary, this yet to emerge client group, being somewhat wealthier, would probably use regional airline services and aeroplane charter companies to visit remote tourist attractions by air rather than driving past distances by road. And then go on a helicopter tour of the local attractions.

At present we must hope our regional airline services do not collapse!

The helicopter industry really needs to form a professional business association which focuses on technical and legislative matters that need to be resolved to ensure the promotion of this new tourist opportunity occurs. Naturally, this means linking up with various state and territory government and industry tourist associations to ensure the promotion of the new concept can be a team effort.

As an aside, at present, many Australian state and territory governments are offering incentives to create new industries to overcome the rising unemployment rate. But nobody is going forward to research and then negotiate government sponsorship which may be available to help start new industries as we move into the "new different normal" way of living in Australia.

One side effect of this possible change, is the aeromedical industry would not be able to cope with large increases in tourist operations in Australia. COVID-19 studies are showing how vulnerable we are in our more remote areas. An expansion of this medical facility, already under some stress, is necessary as the bulk of the tourist industry are a retirees and obviously create increased workload upon regional medical facilities.

Next post will show what the tourism financial figures are showing. We really are sitting on a gold mine, we should ask ourselves is the helicopter industry asleep at the wheel. By comparison, the UAV folks are creating amazing technology driven by folks with vision and prepared to think outside the square.

Are you inside or outside the square?
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby havick » Sun Apr 26 2020, 20:46

rickshaw wrote:Thoughts on Australian post COVID-19 recovery opportunities

Further to our previous posts on this topic and on a more positive note, if only a small percentage of the would-be cruise ship customers decided to stay in Australia and go to our tourist attractions we would possibly be creating an enormous new industry segment for the rotorcraft operators. The tourist attractions are often located in very remote areas. Perhaps, this may be a chance for helicopter operators to participate in tourist activities with clients who previously would spend a lot of money on overseas air/sea voyages and onshore sightseeing.

Australian retirees who traditionally head out in caravans and motorhomes to visit Australian attractions, proudly call themselves the “Grey Nomads.” This group is well known for being very frugal – and not doing aerial scenic flights.

However, the “refugees” from the cruise ship industry are somewhat different as they are used to spending a lot of money on the typical 1 to 2-week cruise. If forced to stay in Australia, due to the post global coronavirus pandemic, they may add a potential new market for the light helicopter industry.

At present, Australia with 2,300+ helicopters, is predominantly a light helicopter fleet. In fact, the Robinson Helicopter Company provides more than half of this number. At a guess, around one third of the Robinson fleet can be found with mustering companies in remote areas; and by therefore would be able to provide typical tourist activities creating a new industry segment.

In summary, this yet to emerge client group, being somewhat wealthier, would probably use regional airline services and aeroplane charter companies to visit remote tourist attractions by air rather than driving past distances by road. And then go on a helicopter tour of the local attractions.

At present we must hope our regional airline services do not collapse!

The helicopter industry really needs to form a professional business association which focuses on technical and legislative matters that need to be resolved to ensure the promotion of this new tourist opportunity occurs. Naturally, this means linking up with various state and territory government and industry tourist associations to ensure the promotion of the new concept can be a team effort.

As an aside, at present, many Australian state and territory governments are offering incentives to create new industries to overcome the rising unemployment rate. But nobody is going forward to research and then negotiate government sponsorship which may be available to help start new industries as we move into the "new different normal" way of living in Australia.

One side effect of this possible change, is the aeromedical industry would not be able to cope with large increases in tourist operations in Australia. COVID-19 studies are showing how vulnerable we are in our more remote areas. An expansion of this medical facility, already under some stress, is necessary as the bulk of the tourist industry are a retirees and obviously create increased workload upon regional medical facilities.

Next post will show what the tourism financial figures are showing. We really are sitting on a gold mine, we should ask ourselves is the helicopter industry asleep at the wheel. By comparison, the UAV folks are creating amazing technology driven by folks with vision and prepared to think outside the square.

Are you inside or outside the square?


Can’t you just increase the scope of the AHIA by way of
simply adding an extra committee within, rather than start a whole different organization?
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Evil Twin » Sun Apr 26 2020, 22:22

I’ve seen no evidence of AHIA achieving anything for the Australian helicopter industry. Lots of promises but no results.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby havick » Sun Apr 26 2020, 22:30

Evil Twin wrote:I’ve seen no evidence of AHIA achieving anything for the Australian helicopter industry. Lots of promises but no results.


Really? Where do you think the majority of the workarounds for the part 61 debacle came from?
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Evil Twin » Mon Apr 27 2020, 05:43

In my experience from the operators that were screaming at CASA the day their operations ground to a halt with the ridiculous crap that the regulator rolled out 'at no cost to industry.'
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Sat May 16 2020, 10:19

Latest CASA regulatory reform processes strike opposition from rotorcraft industry

As Australians see one global crisis slowly receding leaving a damaged VTOL industry, it is now alleged by some, another crisis has emerged due to the misunderstandings about the latest regulations being offered by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

Despite the best of intentions by our safety regulator, the industry is suggesting the addition of another level of complex regulation may prove be more harmful than the COVID-19 pandemic. The proposed new rules are: Part 138 Manual of Standards.

But industry is gathering forces to oppose the Part 138 MOS, especially after CASA’s own Technical Working Group (TWG) rejected the establishment of yet another layer of complex legislation.

However, CASA has opened consultations on the new rules for aerial work operations.

Feedback due 3 Feb 2020.

Urgent: See CASA website and express your point of view.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Sat May 16 2020, 10:52

CASA’s proposed Part 138 MOS – More on ABC News.

Heli-mustering industry raises safety concerns. Hear NT Country Hour with Matt Brann from ABC Radio News

https://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/nt-country-hour/casa-safety-standards-concerns-heli-mustering-industry/12220426

Matt said the heli-mustering industry in northern Australia has raised concerns about proposed changes to aerial work rules. The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) is proposing a new Manual of Standards for Aerial Work Operations covering helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, designed to address safety risks.

But several pilots have told ABC Rural they believe the changes would lower safety standards and could encourage rouge pilots to operate outside the rules.

Matt spoke with aviation industry veteran Mary Brown, from North Queensland Aviation Services, who said there could be some far-reaching consequences if the proposed rules are enforced. (Interview duration: 13 min, Wed 6 May 2020, 1:00 pm.)

Mary also said there are around 122 pages of other complex regulations that must be cross-checked with the proposed MOS. Industry is also alarmed at the very short timeline to complete this work when most of the operators are absent from their bases as the mustering operations probably are reaching their peak.

New rules suggest not allowing the carrying of passengers on charter flights, such as tourist scenic flights. These will not be allowed in the new MOS. These essential revenue sources for small commercial operators will be moved up into Air Transport Legislation to meet some airline type protocols needing new manuals, etc. And upgrading of the operator’s Aerial Operator’s Certificate will be required.

A comprehensive update will be provided in the VTOL Asia-Pacific e-news May Report sent out on Monday 1 June 2020. Will include CEO of CASA’s reply to Mary after her request for a time extension. The CEO has suggested industry comply with their request to submit comments by 3 June 2020. After they have been sorted and published; then the industry and regulator would be able to sit down and commence negotiations over matters needed to be resolved in the best interests of the helicopter community.

Readers should note, there are equivalent regulations concerning aeroplane operations, include crop spraying for both rotorcraft and aeroplanes.

More soon on this important topic.

Reminder: Get your thoughts to CASA via the online service. See website. We must get this right as we try to rebuild our industry damaged by the COVICD-19 pandemic.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Sat May 16 2020, 21:20

Another point of view on Australian tourist flights.

Good news in disguise? For helicopter tourist operators in Australia.

Some interesting comments from a social media source in relation to flying on an airline when undertaking a future holiday after the coronavirus pandemic.

Comment 1. There are two things that I need to know before I'll pay for a ticket again; firstly, if my flight is cancelled then will I get my money back within a reasonable timeframe (not credits, no six month delays etc);and secondly, will my travel insurance cover any costs (including flights) if there is a flare up of Covid-19 that means that my travel has to be cancelled. Unless these happen then I won't be travelling until I'm certain that either case is highly unlikely.

Comment 2. A very good point James. I had two visitors from UK stay with me in February. Just before they were due to go home Emirates stopped all flights to Adelaide. They had to pay $5000 just to get home on Qatar via Perth in the end. To my knowledge they are still waiting for any reimbursement for Emirates and of course the Qatar ticket can't be claimed against the travel insurance as it due to a pandemic.

So, who going to risk a repeat of that in a hurry? Not me. I was going to return the visit later this year before all this blew up. No way now. Will be at least 18 months before I even look at it.

My next holiday will be driving somewhere like up the centre of Australia to Darwin.

These comments are very timely as this sounds like an opportunity for the large number of small helicopter operators in remote areas of Australia. Although, their main business is supporting the mustering industry and other aerial work activities of a similar nature; tourism, is claimed, scenic flights keeps them in business – a bit like the straw that broke the camel’s back saying?

But will this change if the proposed Part 138 MOS is introduced whereby the small companies cannot continue their scenic flights until they move up into the legislative nightmare required by the upgrade to the Air Transport legislation.

What are your thoughts?

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